Digital era. Digital money. Crypto.

Everyone has already heard about digital money, for bitcoin. Lightweight hunting? Bas and not. Bitcoin has ups and downs, and these upbringing depended on the idea that bitcoin would be worth something. But it’s money without cover. Why does he grow in value? The first relationship of supply and demand. And the amount of bitcoin is limited. And the demand, with the help of marketing, is growing, and here is the price rise. To make money on digital money, you need to be pretty cautious. There are big players who are starting to buy quickly, and the price starts to grow, because it reduces the offer, and then sells a little at a higher price. Below I will explain what is bitcoin. Have fun.

When I say bitcoin, a lot of people has weird look on their faces. Bit what? Coin? 10101010100? Money? Short story, digital money. A lot of 1010100001000110101010101010101011. But, what is BItcoin??? This article is from coindesk. Bitcoin is a form of digital currency, created and held electronically. No one controls it. Bitcoins aren’t printed, like dollars or euros – they’re produced by people, and increasingly businesses, running computers all around the world, using software that solves mathematical problems.

It’s the first example of a growing category of money known as cryptocurrency.

What makes it different from normal currencies?

Bitcoin can be used to buy things electronically. In that sense, it’s like conventional dollars, euros, or yen, which are also traded digitally.

However, bitcoin’s most important characteristic, and the thing that makes it different to conventional money, is that it is decentralized. No single institution controls the bitcoin network. This puts some people at ease, because it means that a large bank can’t control their money.

Who created it?

A software developer called Satoshi Nakamoto proposed bitcoin, which was an electronic payment system based on mathematical proof. The idea was to produce a currency independent of any central authority, transferable electronically, more or less instantly, with very low transaction fees.

Who prints it?

No one. This currency isn’t physically printed in the shadows by a central bank, unaccountable to the population, and making its own rules. Those banks can simply produce more money to cover the national debt, thus devaluing their currency.

Instead, bitcoin is created digitally, by a community of people that anyone can join. Bitcoins are ‘mined’, using computing power in a distributed network.

This network also processes transactions made with the virtual currency, effectively making bitcoin its own payment network.

So you can’t churn out unlimited bitcoins?

That’s right. The bitcoin protocol – the rules that make bitcoin work – say that only 21 million bitcoins can ever be created by miners. However, these coins can be divided into smaller parts (the smallest divisible amount is one hundred millionth of a bitcoin and is called a ‘Satoshi’, after the founder of bitcoin).

What is bitcoin based on?

Conventional currency has been based on gold or silver. Theoretically, you knew that if you handed over a dollar at the bank, you could get some gold back (although this didn’t actually work in practice). But bitcoin isn’t based on gold; it’s based on mathematics.

Around the world, people are using software programs that follow a mathematical formula to produce bitcoins. The mathematical formula is freely available, so that anyone can check it.

The software is also open source, meaning that anyone can look at it to make sure that it does what it is supposed to.

What are its characteristics?

Bitcoin has several important features that set it apart from government-backed currencies.

1. It’s decentralized

The bitcoin network isn’t controlled by one central authority. Every machine that mines bitcoin and processes transactions makes up a part of the network, and the machines work together. That means that, in theory, one central authority can’t tinker with monetary policy and cause a meltdown – or simply decide to take people’s bitcoins away from them, as the Central European Bank decided to do in Cyprus in early 2013. And if some part of the network goes offline for some reason, the money keeps on flowing.

2. It’s easy to set up

Conventional banks make you jump through hoops simply to open a bank account. Setting up merchant accounts for payment is another Kafkaesque task, beset by bureaucracy. However, you can set up a bitcoin address in seconds, no questions asked, and with no fees payable.

3. It’s anonymous

Well, kind of. Users can hold multiple bitcoin addresses, and they aren’t linked to names, addresses, or other personally identifying information. However…

4. It’s completely transparent

…bitcoin stores details of every single transaction that ever happened in the network in a huge version of a general ledger, called the blockchain. The blockchain tells all.

If you have a publicly used bitcoin address, anyone can tell how many bitcoins are stored at that address. They just don’t know that it’s yours.

There are measures that people can take to make their activities more opaque on the bitcoin network, though, such as not using the same bitcoin addresses consistently, and not transferring lots of bitcoin to a single address.

5. Transaction fees are miniscule

Your bank may charge you a £10 fee for international transfers. Bitcoin doesn’t.

6. It’s fast

You can send money anywhere and it will arrive minutes later, as soon as the bitcoin network processes the payment.

7. It’s non-repudiable

When your bitcoins are sent, there’s no getting them back, unless the recipient returns them to you. They’re gone forever.

There are many tools on the net, but this is one that is good. 

Google Trends is a great tool for reporting search trends over time.

As Willi Wo covered previously, you can use it to detect bitcoin price bubbles, and all sorts of interesting data that can inform trading strategies. 

For this, we again examine the search term ‘BTC USD’.

If you’re an active bitcoin user, it’s likely you’ll be checking the price periodically, and a proportion of users type ‘BTC USD’ into Google to do just that.

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In this way, I’d argue we can use the search term as an effective proxy for the growth and engagement of active bitcoin users over time. From the chart above, we can see that the bitcoin user base is in a period of exponential growth.

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What we have here is a steady exponential growth baseline with periodic peaks.

Taking readings from the baseline shows an order of magnitude of growth every 3.375 years. Or, expressed in terms of time, the user base doubles approximately every 12 months.